milking

cow’s teat, finger thick
unbothered by squeezing hands
these cows know their names

*************************

I feel very lucky indeed to be able to get some of my food from a milking shed instead of a grocery store. Agriculture depends on the overall thriving of nature. That’s why I think this site is important: www.geoengineeringwatch.org.

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neighbor explains

antelopes
will
cross gulleys
but
don’t jump fences

antelopes learn
fast
where to find gates
two
posts closely placed
no
wire—antelopes pass
cattle can’t

and he told me
he once raced
an antelope
in his car
at 45 mph
the buck
accelerated
cut right across the road
in front of him

*******************

pronghorn-205092_640

Photo: See it at Pixabay here.

************************
 
I feel privileged to see wild animals frequently and I want them to thrive. That’s why I find this website important: www.geoengineeringwatch.org.

10/27/2014

bird hammers house
I’m still in bed on Monday!
so much in my thoughts

*********************

Here I am, trying to get back to work on Monday, with my daily suggestion to visit this site, because it’s important!: www.geoengineeringwatch.org.

greenhouse

geranium bush
almost enough to hide in
damp smeared windows

geranium-384830_640

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo: See it at Pixabay here.

***********************

I love seeing plants thrive. That’s why I’ve found it valuable to inform myself about the environmental conditions they’re dealing with at www.geoengineeringwatch.org.

what choice do we have?

what choice do we have
but to be naked?
the flimsy cloth that covers
us
merely a dusting—
obscures fleshed contours with seams
of precision
draws the eye away
from certain shadows
but momentarily
only momentarily

rooftops reveal
our dwelling places
easily wounded
in an age of bombs

our doorways and driveways
innocently, incessantly proclaim
I live here
you live there
and of course
the thief knows it

there is no place at all
no place at all to hide

this quivering heart

no place—

for those who dare

the freedom of the open sky
the budding of tenderness
the resilience of song

could be perfect shelter   — 2001

******************************

When I wrote this poem in August, 2001, there was a lot I didn’t know about, but could only glimpse through intuition and a “felt sense.” Nowadays, when I reread this piece, I’m amazed how much it had to say about the life looming ahead of me. My perspective is that we need to build true shelter more than ever. One of the bombs I didn’t know about then, but understand somewhat now, is geoengineering: www.geoengineeringwatch.org.